How to Improve Posture in Old Age

Written by
Emily Carver

How to Improve Posture in Old Age

Bad posture is an incredibly common issue for people of all ages, especially with increased time spent looking at screens and sitting down. You may have noticed that with older age, maintaining your good posture has become more challenging. Changes in your posture are a common part of the ageing process but that doesn't mean it’s impossible to improve posture in old age. You can avoid stooping posture in old age by making some small regular changes to your lifestyle.

7 Great Ways to Improve Your Posture as You Age

Many people ask us ‘can you correct your posture at any age?’ and the answer is yes, absolutely. Improving your posture can help you to relieve back pain, improve your breathing and even support your gut health. 

Middletons has put together a list of 7 different ways to improve your posture as you age to help you get started. 

1. Check your chair

If you’re wondering how to improve posture while sitting, an ergonomic chair could be a great choice for you. They have been specifically designed to support your body by placing your back in the optimum position to help improve posture whilst providing you with comfort and support. It’s important to find the right ergonomic chair for you and your needs, helping to support the overall health of your back.

2. Sleep posture

The average adult sleeps for 8 hours a day, so maintaining a good posture during those hours is important for your spine health. Sleeping on your back promotes better alignment and can help alleviate the pressure on your arms, legs and shoulders. 

Woman lying down on Middletons bed

An adjustable bed will help align your back in the perfect position, helping you to alleviate pain and stand taller throughout the day.

3. Get regular exercise

Regular exercise will help you to reduce stiffness and strengthen the all-important muscles in your core. Between the ages of 65 and 74 the average person spends 10 hours per day sitting, this increases by the age of 75+ to 11 hours per day. Where possible, put time aside each day to go for a walk and your posture will certainly begin to feel the benefit. 

4. Try exercises that you can do sitting down

You may be wondering how to improve posture in old age if you are living with an injury, disability or mobility needs. Many of our customers have found that gentle exercises that you can do sitting down have been particularly helpful for those suffering from arthritis, circulation problems and muscle weakness. These exercises have been specifically designed to alleviate pressure from the lower body while helping you to build strength and improve your posture.

5. Change your diet

A healthy diet can also have a positive effect on your posture. It has been shown that by incorporating more calcium and vitamin d into your diet, you can improve bone density, helping to support your spine. 

Images of eggs, salmon and sardines for Vitamin D

6. Wall posture exercises

Wall posture training can help you to check in with your alignment. 

  1. Place your back flat against the wall
  2. Gently alter your posture to try and touch the shoulders, back of the head, lower spine and buttocks to the wall
  3. Be careful not to strain or excessively arch the back
  4. Try this exercise at least once a day for 30 seconds at a time

    7. Shoulder blade exercises

    This is an exercise that you can do regularly throughout the day to help check your posture. You can try setting reminders or alarms to help you maintain a consistent and regular practice.

    1. Imagine a £1 coin between your shoulder blades.
    2. Gently press your shoulder blades back and down, imagining that you’re pinching the £1 coin between them
    3. Be careful not to raise your shoulders
    4. Try this exercise holding for five seconds at a time and repeat it five times or more as needed. 

    Why is good posture important?

    Your health regarding posture and ageing can have a knock-on effect go other common, and more dangerous health issues. Poor posture in the elderly could affect your balance, making you more prone to accidents and falls and even affect your breathing. 

    Having good posture can help to improve your circulation in addition to relieving back pain. It’s never too late to improve your posture and enjoy the potential benefits. We hoped that these tips have helped. 

    If you have concerns about the health of your spine, please contact your GP for medical advice.

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